Following the change of government in August 2021, most of the health workers in Afghanistan were no longer getting paid. Medicines were no longer available, and many health professionals deserted the country’s hospitals in search of incomes. As a result, patients were sometimes refused access to treatment and the overall healthcare system in the country was on the verge of coming to a full stop. In this episode, we ask, what does the future of sustainable healthcare look like in Afghanistan for those seeking lifesaving medical services?

We speak with Dr. Mariam Moksudi, a gynecologist at Rabia Balkhi Hospital in Kabul and one of the more than 10,5000 health care staff the ICRC is backing through the Hospital Resilience Project, which support 33 hospitals and nine medical institutions around the country.

Then we turn to Ana Lucia Bueno, ICRC’s health coordinator in Kabul, who explains how the ICRC has been supporting hospitals for decades and began the project after the change of government in August 2021.

Dr. Mariam Moksudi is a gynecologist at the Rabia Bal-khi Hospital in Kabul. She says it was her dream to become a doctor. Photo Credit: Mohammad Masoud Samimi/Rabia Bal-khi Hospital

The high maternal mortality rates are due to a number of factors like poverty, lack of access to health care, and education. Photo Credit: Mohammad Masoud Samimi/Rabia Bal-khi Hospital

 

Dr. Mariam says her four children are her main source of motivation and keep her going on a daily basis. Photo Credit: Mohammad Masoud Samimi/Rabia Bal-khi Hospital

Important Links

More than a 110,000 babies were born this year in Afghanistan, read more about how the ICRC is combating maternal mortality.

Read more about the Afghan health professionals saving lives at the 33 hospitals the ICRC supports.